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SNDAN Trumpet & Tenor Sax alpha

Breath-controlled additive synthesis experiment

(14 Votes)
2.0 (Updated 1 month ago)
145.3MB
July 22, 2021
Reaktor 6
Other Test Area

DESCRIPTION

EDIT: V2 now includes a tenor sax.

This is an experiment in additive synthesis.

Sampled trumpet & tenor sax tones were analyzed with the SNDAN sound analysis software created by Prof. James W. Beauchamp at the University of Illinois. Every other semitone was analyzed, at multiple velocities (for tonguing) and volumes (for timbre). The SNDAN analysis information was then exported, formatted, and imported into Reaktor data tables that drive an additive sine bank synthesizer.

The tones sound remarkably like the original samples. The audio file was created while playing the synthesizer with a wind controller.

This is an experiment only and requires a wind controller, or any other MIDI continuous controller that sends CC#2. Velocity controls the tonguing and CC#2 controls the volume and timbre.

COMMENTS  (20)

Wiola Thoms
2 weeks ago
This is another ace from you, my friend could not believe this came from a synth. Chet you've not only inspired but with your ensembles have allowed me to discard samples to large part. Without you I never would've tried physical modelling and realized not only it's numerous possiblities like realism and flexibility, bt that every synth can do it, which inspired me to learn FM and additive. Right now I'm using many Reaktor esnembles and the resonance and subercomb filters in Absynth and especially Absynth has surprised me in how good it is. Anyway, best of luck to you Chet and billion thanks, you have truly left your mark on virtual instruments and many many makers of them and programmin musicians!
Softyman123
3 weeks ago
These would be so excellent with Pitch bend. Amazing work so far. Loving your instruments thank you, most impressive.
Chet Singer
3 weeks ago
I hear them too. I think what's happening is that a new note-on is beginning before the previous one has decayed. I have some ideas to fix it but none of them are simple.
Cmyth
3 weeks ago
Woah, these sound amazing! Having so much fun playing with these! I have noticed though a clicking/popping noise when playing phrases without legato/overlapping notes. Here's what it sounds like for me https://www.dropbox.com/s/n1sywqfmslc2bl5/Tenor%20Sax.wav?dl=0
Neil Elver
3 weeks ago
Having owned an EWI USB wind controller for 10 years, I have never had as realistic playing and sonic experience as when using your reactor instruments. Add a touch of reverb, map some CC# and just play. Very excited about these recent developments!
Chet Singer
1 month ago
Yes, making a saxophone required few changes to the ensemble: different data in the tables, more harmonics in the sine bank, and not much else.
andrew aronson
1 month ago
!!! this method of analysis ---> additive synthesis is very promising. is this process generalization, aka were you able to get the saxaphone tables into the instrument without too much modification of the original?
windplayer
1 month ago
These new instruments are very promising. I also like the soprano sax sound. The expanded range works better in the higher than in the lower note range (IMHO!). When playing a triller (fast change between two notes), the transition could be a little bit smoother. This is perhaps an idea to get the good instruments even better.
windplayer
1 month ago
This is great news, thank you very much!
Chet Singer
1 month ago
I've begun using this same technology on some tenor sax samples. This means the Fourier analysis results can be shifted downward, creating a "bigger" sax. I'll post it soon.
windplayer
1 month ago
This does not sound like "an experiment"; this is - once again - a great instrument for a windcontroller! Thank you! I like the wide range of this trumpet. Is it possible to use this technology also with your Reaktor tenor sax to get a wider range (bass range - for exemple)?
Chet Singer
1 month ago
Sorry, no, I've never written any.
Ferenc Pécsi
1 month ago
Hi Chet, I have 1 more (probably stupid) question: Have you any kind of user manual to your instrument (Silverwood Sax /Clarinet, Dannenberg Brass)?
Ferenc Pécsi
1 month ago
Thanks, Chet I have tried everything but it doesn't work. I will stay at Dannenberg Brass which is good for Aerophone too.
Chet Singer
1 month ago
Hello Ferenc, the hardness of the attack is indeed determined by the note-on velocity. I've tested it with an AKAI wind controller but I don't have an Aerophone to try it with. Hard attacks begin with a velocity of about 96. Make sure your Aerophone is set to variable (not fixed at 64) velocity.
Ferenc Pécsi
1 month ago
Hi Chet Singer, the tone (timbre) is very good I am not able to get trumpet-like hard attack at the beginning of the sound? Is it possible that my Aerophone AE-10 can't produce high enough velocity? (With the Dannenberg Brass I hev no problem. Any suggestion?
andrew aronson
1 month ago
holy smokes man, this is incredible. that squeak at the end!!! speechless. you are like yoda, of reaktor, at this point
Rasmus Jakobsen
1 month ago
Amazing indeed - and hard to tell from a real trumpet - except perhaps for the extreme consistency in "playing" - perhaps it would be possible to introduce minute fluctuations of some of the control parameters.....
Thomas Alenfors
1 month ago
Your instruments are amazing!!
Matthew Babineaux
1 month ago
Sound even BETTER than the previous Dannenberg trumpet and I love that there are more accurate controls to get the nuances of real brass players. The Fourier shift captures exactly what I was looking to control in terms of tone color for my brass orchestrations, and I LOVE the harmonic eq. It reminds me of the Bell filter from Silverwood, and I've been really needing something like that to control tone color throughout the ranges of the instruments. The other changes were spectacular, but those two absolutely knocked the ball out of the park! LOVE IT!
now