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I'm sorry but traktor does not make you a DJ

Discussion in 'TRAKTOR 3' started by wild_andy_c, Aug 9, 2008.

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  1. wild_andy_c

    wild_andy_c Forum Member

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  2. chilly

    chilly Returning Customer

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    /Added


    FREAK
     
  3. wild_andy_c

    wild_andy_c Forum Member

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    228
    Cool Chilli - love your tunes on myspace - i gotta learn how to customize mine.

    Is Telly on myspace too ?
     
  4. TeLLy

    TeLLy NI Product Owner Extraordinaire

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    6,430
    Yes and no, I opened a page but did nothing to it. Find me on Facebook and fondle my wall or poke or whatever it is the kids do on Facebook nowadays. I have pictures of me wearing a thong (on my head), my girlfriend's baby tee, and tons of crotch shots. You'll love it, trust me.
     
  5. jakt

    jakt New Member

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    this is an example of what this whole thread is about (if i understand you)...

    if you buy traktor and have no prior experience mixing records (or even cdj) you wont see what the benefits are. all you will see is functions. the "hours" put into learning your records, learning what works, learning your eq control, learning your set programing all stem from that simple act of speeding one record to match the tempo of the second.

    so while the people that just midi dj may have a point - vinyl djs (like myself) are slighted that complete morons that only have skill with dragging, dropping and pressing play are calling themselves djs - you have to see it for what it really is..

    there is an overall acceptance of mediocraty in evey aspect of society today. anything that is too hard to do is "lame" and if the wole world can't do it then its not worth doing. in this day and age i can't see why anyone with a brain on their shoulders would have a problem with a purist. let alone defending the actions of thousands of hacks with 9 pages of forum posts.

    you can't argue that learning to walk as a baby opens the doors to running, skiing, swiming, playing a drum kit, karate, blah blah blah... its the same thing here. learning to beatmatch properly takes time and in that time you learn more than you ever could learn then just registering your NI liscence.

    tink tink - 2 cents.

    jakt
    www.myspace.com/jaktnjeffmath
     
  6. Zac Kyoti

    Zac Kyoti NI Product Owner

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    I don't normally like to weigh in on such old threads, but this one always gets me fired up.
    I don't get this whole "issue". I started off spinning vinyl records, and did that for ten years before I went midi. Been spinning digital for two years now. I have perspective. For sure. To me, the equation is so simple: If you are a digital dj, and you have no ear, shitty taste, and no talent for programming, you will sound like crap. The Sync button has nothing to do with it. If you are a vinyl/timecode dj and you have no ear, shitty taste, and no talent for programming, you WILL also sound like crap.
    Matching beats is a mechanical process that is only necessary because of the technology being used for playback. It also has a side effect of feeling good, and forces you to pay very close attention to the music, which in turn helps Develop Your Skills. Did this process help me as a dj? Yes. Did I enjoy it? Yes. Do I still use beatmatching skills as a digital jock? Very often. Did I actually want to HAVE to beatmatch as a vinyl dj? NO.
    Like I said, beatmatching was kind of this unavoidable part of using turntables to mix with, and I never minded it, but I did fantasize about future technologies where I could be able to pull random elements from a palette of sound and that all elements would be instantly synchronous, letting me concentrate on composition, flow, development. ...Look what has happened;)

    Think about this for a second without hangups or prejudices:
    If I want to mix together two elements (records, clips, whatever), and I already know that I want them to be at the same tempo, WHY do I want to spend my precious time working on a simple mechanical process to align the tempos of those elements? The process itself DOES NOT SERVE THE MUSIC. The process IS good for the DJ. But I could also be using that time to effect, drop, rock, freak, and otherwise blow the crowd away. The answer for me, is that I don't. I love to spin traditionally for the FEEL of it. But I will NEVER bail my controllers just to go back to the way I used to do it.
    So here's how I feel about this:
    1) There is nothing wrong with, or more or less authentic about either way of djing music. Vinyl is more physical. There's a certain romantic quality there. Digital allows for a **** ton of new techniques, ways of working with your sound.
    2) If you suck, you will suck. Trust me. The sync button will not fix that. Vinyl djs should not feel threatened. I'd have to agree with some of the above posts that claim vinyl djs have a defensive posture due to feeling threatened. I would also say people want to defend a skill they've put countless hours into developing, and that they feel has made them a better dj. That's natural.
    3) If djs learned both traditional control and digital control methods, they'd be better off, and maybe everyone would chill the **** out.
    4) If a Dj uses Ableton Live, why is it no one bitches about how "authentic" they are, LOL! Maybe because "sync" is an integral part of how their dj tool works? ;)
    5) In the end, judging someone without hearing their work, just because you found out they "sync", is ridiculous. If they call themselves a dj and they suck, it will be apparent 3:00 minutes into their set, regardless of the medium they use. Judge them then, if that's your thing. If you are listening to a digital dj, and they have paid their dues in practice and development, you will hear it, and that work deserves the same measure of respect the vinyl jock gets for his/her work.

    I love my vinyl, it makes me smile and sounds so good.
    I love my midi controllers, I can't even believe some of the **** I can pull off nowadays.
     
  7. DjStrategy

    DjStrategy NI Product Owner

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    @ Zak Kyoti

    +1000 ;)
     
  8. jakt

    jakt New Member

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    again, we are missing the point.

    theres a lot of hot air and bragging here, but i'll add my own story for perspective. im a producer. i use ableton to write with, and i've used it to dj with, too. i started on vinyl then switched to timecode. (i hate cdjs). i know that i can beatmatch well, but more importantly, i can mix well. this has to do with my ears, for sure. it has to do with planning/programming, too. so when you say a shitty dj will remain shitty regardless of sync, i'll say i totally agree.


    its just that the very people that you are trying to single out there are the same people using that argument in their favor. i've seen loads of crap djs that used grid mixing, both with traktor and with ableton. and they had a LOT of trouble with mixing. and ironically, the guys i know that started 10-15 years ago when i did who also made the switch now to digital still have excellent sounding mixes.


    again, you are totally right - if you are a crap dj, you will just be a crap dj that uses stripes. the problem is that certain "djs" (loosely) use this very argument in their defence because the market is flooded with mediocraty to the point it is the accemted benchmark...
     
  9. escapemcp

    escapemcp New Member

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    9
    What makes a good DJ this day and age is good contacts, good people skills, good business cards, good websites, but mixing.... meh....

    DJ's, cause of who they know, can get gigs well easy, despite the fact that they think an orbit is stick of gum... and please don't get me started on these sorts who use MixMeister.

    I have mixed now for 15 years, starting out on some naff belt drive things with seperate pitch controls for 33 & 45! Is all I have played is a few house parties (that rocked :). I'd *love* to have a set at a club (just 1!), but figure that its already too crowded with average-at-best DJs, so I just don't bother.

    Sorry, am I even on topic here... OK, I'll go..
     
  10. geckotime

    geckotime New Member

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    I use the sync button every time. I don't use headphones, don't cue and I go straight from the line-out into the mixer and/or amp. I dj at home, friends houses, bars and clubs. I know my tunes and I use the waveforms to judge when to mix bringing the new track in slowly. I've been told I'm a brilliant dj. What is it that makes me good?
    My taste.
     
  11. trance alba

    trance alba Forum Member

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    612
    +1

    I still love the title of this thread; traktor does not make you a dj
    well duhhh....
    owning a tennis racket doesnt make me a tennis player, only with a lot of passion and practice would i call myself such.
     
  12. chilly

    chilly Returning Customer

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    But what if you own 4 tennis rackets?
     
  13. trance alba

    trance alba Forum Member

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    612
    well that's passion out the way, you're half way there! ;)
     
  14. Karlos Santos

    Karlos Santos Rocket Man Moderator

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    Good God why did this thread get brought back to life ?
    Total Necro.
    It was trouble before and nearly a year out of date it will be trouble again.

    [closed]
     
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