DRUMS AND RECORDING EQUIPMENT

100% AUTHENTIC

Recreating the sound of an era is not just a question of EQ or effects. Only by using the instruments, the recording equipment and the techniques of the period is it possible to capture the distinctive sound.

For example: In contrast to modern drum kits where the wood used is young and grown specifically for the purpose, the timber used to make these vintage drums has matured over many years, giving an unparalleled tonal quality. Much as a concert violinist would use an instrument that is at least 60 or 70 years of age, discerning drummers are attracted to these rare vintage drums for their beautiful and unique tone.

Just about every articulation possible was played on each of the drums, including brush articulations for the first time in an ABBEY ROAD Series. Drums were recorded in up to 27 velocity layers and 4 round robins.

DRUM KIT 1: EBONY KIT, JAMES BLADES KIT

  • Kick: 26” Leedy Kick - 1940
  • Snare 1: 14” x 5” Ludwig Black Beauty Gut Snare - 1920s
  • Snare 2: 14” x 6.5” Leedy Broadway - 1940s
  • Snare 3: 14” x 5” George Lawrence Stone – 1920s
  • Rack Tom: original calfskin 12” tom tom - late 1930s
  • Floor Tom: original calfskin 16” tom tom - late 1930s
  • Cymbals: Zildjian First Stamp - dating from 1929 to 1939

DRUM KIT 2: IVORY KIT, SLINGERLAND RADIO KING

  • Kick: 22“ Slingerland Radio King Kick - 1940s
  • Snare 1: 14” x 4” Ludwig Black Beauty - 1920s
  • Snare 2: 13” x 3” Ludwig Tango - 1920s
  • Snare 3: 14” x 5.5” Slingerland Radio King - 1940s
  • Rack Tom: 13” Slingerland Radio King original calfskin tom tom - 1940s
  • Floor Tom: 16” Slingerland Radio King original calfskin tom tom - 1940s
  • Cymbals: Zildjian Trans Stamp – manufactured in the 40s

THE RECORDING EQUIPMENT

Before the arrival of electrical recording in the mid 1920s, recordings were entirely mechanical – acoustic horns were used to simply ‘collect’ the vibrations in the air. The introduction of microphones and electrical recording completely revolutionized the sound recording industry. Abbey Road Studios were at the forefront of this new recording revolution.

Alan Blumlein, an unfamiliar name to most, was an EMI technical engineer responsible for many advances in recording techniques in the 20th century. Abbey Road Studios owns the very last examples of two legendary Blumlein-designed microphones from the 1930s. They were used on this project, along with state-of-the-art equipment, to provide a combination of authentic colour and modern tonal control.

THE RECORDING TEAM

ABBEY ROAD | VINTAGE DRUMMER was recorded by Mirek Stiles and assisted by Pete Hutchins of Abbey Road Studios. Drumming duties were performed by one of London’s most-requested musicians, Paul Clarvis. Native Instruments Sound Designers Julian Laping and Sebastian Müller were on hand to oversee the sessions.
ABBEY ROAD and the ABBEY ROAD logo are trademarks of EMI (IP) Limited used under license.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners and the use of them does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by them.

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